Aphorism 2

§ 2 The highest ideal of cure is rapid, gentle and permanent restoration of the health, or removal and annihilation of the disease in its whole extent, in the shortest, most reliable, and most harmless way, on easily comprehensible principles. Outline by Julian Winston (2001): The ideal cure is rapid, gentle, permanent and removes the … Continue reading

Aphorism 4

§ 4 He is likewise a preserver of health if he knows the things that derange health and cause disease, and how to remove them from persons in health. Outline by Julian Winston (2001): The need to recognise and remove the maintaining causes.

Aphorism 6

§ 6 The unprejudiced observer – well aware of the futility of transcendental speculations which can receive no confirmation from experience – be his powers of penetration ever so great, takes note of nothing in every individual disease, except the changes in the health of the body and of the mind (morbid phenomena, accidents, symptoms) … Continue reading

Aphorism 7

§ 7 Now, as in a disease, from which no manifest exciting or maintaining cause (causa occasionalis) has to be removed1, we can perceive nothing but the morbid symptoms, it must (regard being had to the possibility of a miasm, and attention paid to the accessory circumstances, § 5) be the symptoms alone by which … Continue reading

Aphorism 8

§ 8 It is not conceivable, not can it be proved by any experience in the world, that, after removal of all the symptoms of the disease and of the entire collection of the perceptible phenomena, there should or could remain anything else besides health, or that the morbid alteration in the interior could remain … Continue reading

Aphorism 9

§ 9 In the healthy condition of man, the spiritual vital force (autocracy), the dynamis that animates the material body (organism), rules with unbounded sway, and retains all the parts of the organism in admirable, harmonious, vital operation, as regards both sensations and functions, so that our indwelling, reason-gifted mind can freely employ this living, … Continue reading

Aphorism 10

§ 10 Fifth Edition The material organism, without the vital force, is capable of no sensation, no function, no self-preservation1, it derives all sensation and performs all the functions of life solely by means of the immaterial being (the vital force) which animates the material organism in health and in disease. 1 It is dead, … Continue reading