Aphorism 288

§ 288 Fifth Edition The action of medicines in the liquid from1 upon the living human body takes place in such a penetrating manner, spreads out from the point of the sensitive fibers provided with nerves whereto the medicine is first applied with such inconceivable rapidity and so universally through all parts of the living … Read more

Aphorism 289

§ 289 Fifth Edition Every part of our body that possesses the sense of touch is also capable of receiving the influences, and of propagating their power to all other parts.1 1 A patient even destitute of the sense of smell may expect an equally perfect action and cure from the medicine by olfaction. § … Read more

Aphorism 293

§ 293 I find it necessary to allude here to animal magnetism, as it is termed, or rather mesmerism (as it should be called, out of gratitude to Mesmer, its first founder), which differs so much in its nature from all other therapeutic agents. This curative power, often so stupidly denied, which streams upon a … Read more

Aphorism 294

§ 294 All the above-mentioned methods of practicing mesmerism depend upon an influx of more or less vital force into the patient, and hence are termed positive mesmerism.1 An opposite mode of employing mesmerism, however, as it produces just the contrary effect, deserves to be termed negative mesmerism. To this belong the passes which are … Read more